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Muscle hypertrophy

Top 10 Tips to Add Muscle

tips to add muscle, high performance exercises

I’m going to keep this simple and straight forward.  If you’re not building muscle, you’re probably missing the basics.

1. Eat Big to Get Big

You can’t put 60 miles worth of gasoline and drive 120 miles can you? Providing your body with the essential calories and nutrients is rule #1. You will be working hard in the gym, you not only need to provide enough calories to fuel your workout, but you also need a caloric surplus in order to gain weight. For each meal aim for 1-2 fistfuls of protein (30g or so), 2 fists of vegetables, healthy fats, and carbs such as sweet potatoes or rice. Track what you eat using a site such as livestrong.com and consider reading up on carb cycling to maximize muscle and minimize fat.  Supershakes are a convenient and easy way to pack your body full of quality nutrients for muscle growth.

2. Progressive Overload

To build muscle you must follow the laws of progressive overload. You must continuously work to add weight to the bar, increase the speed you move the bar, increase the number of reps, or decrease rest periods each time you set foot in the gym. Give your body a reason to grow by challenging to a new level every chance you get (within reason), repeating the same workout pound for pound and word for word will not help yield the gains you are looking for.


3. Stick with Compound Exercises

Mixing in endless amounts of curls, leg extensions, calf raises, and lateral raises will do little more than delay your recovery and hinder your progress. Stick with squats, deadlifts, presses, bench presses, chin ups, dips, hip thrusts, and rows to build a well rounded physique. Major structural exercises like these will work the most muscle mass and stimulate the biggest release of testosterone to fuel your muscle growth. You don’t need gimmicky machines, cable crossovers, and shiny new equipment to get the job done; they are often a waste of time. Pay your dues with a barbell, kettlebells, dumbbells, and your own bodyweight to move your body the way it was built to move.


4.  Train Heavy

Training heavy is becoming a lost art in many gyms. I see so many people training every exercise at 12-15 reps chasing the pump that it makes me sick. Most individuals tend to follow body part splits with crazy high volume and rep ranges that only work for beginners and/or steroid users. Most drug free lifters make phenomenal gains by putting more weight on the bar and focusing on rep ranges between 3-8. Anything over 8 reps really begins developing endurance unless you can handle significant weight for reps. Bottom Line: If you add 50 pounds to your squat or a deadlift in a year you will be bigger, add weight and see magic happen!


5. Get In Get Out

Workouts are meant to stimulate, not annihilate the body. Get in a solid warm up and try to complete your workout in 45 minute or less. You are in the gym to work out and see results, not socialize in-between sets on the preacher curl. Get in, get out, eat, and repeat.

6. Sleep 8+ Hours

You need to recovery to grow, and optimal growth and recovery comes with getting 8+ hours of sleep per night. Sleeping well and long will increase your testosterone naturally while giving you more energy and making you more efficient throughout the day. Turn off the TV and get some sleep

7. Foam Roll

Staying healthy and recovering from workouts is absolutely vital to making consistent progress in the gym. Foam roll troubled areas such as the shoulders, pecs, IT bands, calves, and piriformis to improve movement quality. Pick up a foam roller or use tennis balls, baseballs, softballs (ouch), medicine balls to break up scar tissue. If you are financially able try to get a deep tissue massage once per week.


8. Incorporate SOME higher reps into your training

The emphasis on your training still needs to be on lower repetition multi-joint exercises to build muscle. However, increasing reps on occasion to 10-15 reps will increase your muscles ability to store glycogen and water. This will add volume to the muscle and increase their size. This is known as non-functional hypertrophy. If you goal is solely aesthetics and not strength/power mix 1-2 exercises per workout with a higher volume. Just be aware this can compromise your performance on big lifts!


9. Keep a Workout Journal

Writing down your workouts and tracking your progress is incredibly important to make consistent gains in the gym. How in the heck will you know when you have a new PR, or when you increased your reps by 5 on your squat from 2 months ago? Keeping a detailed workout journal will show you exactly what has worked in the past and what has not. Your workouts will improve and so will your knowledge of how your body reacts to different workouts.


10. De-load every 6-8 weeks

De-loading the muscles and nervous system every month or two will keep you healthy and mentally fresh in the long term. Muscle building is not an overnight ordeal, it takes years to build and smart programming. Take a complete week off on occasion, drop your intensity, or your volume for a week to allow joints, ligaments, and the nervous system to health up.

The Top 10 Tips to Add Muscle

Lift heavy, eat, sleep, repeat to get the gains you want. By taking these tips and focusing on 1 at a time until it becomes common practice will bring your training and physique to where it wants to be.
And if you’re looking for a program to get rollin,’ I’ve got you covered here.

Get Your 12 Week HFT Mass Program Today

Big 4: Overhead Press

Welcome to the third, and final installment of the Big 4 series.  So far, the deadlift has been covered here , and the bench press here.This series is comprised of four major barbell lifts, the bench, squat, overhead press, and deadlift. These four exercises are the most efficient exercises for building strength, power, confidence, and an impressive physique.


This installment will cover the overhead press, also known as the military press or barbell press. Unlike the bench press, squat, and deadlift, the overhead press has unfortunately been removed from powerlifting and Olympic lifting competition, which has led to a decrease in popularity. The overhead press is performed by standing (yes standing, not seated on a bench “Bucko”) and pressing a weighted barbell overhead. The overhead press is exceptional in that it not only builds ridiculously strong shoulders and triceps; it also challenges the core, upper back, and lats to maintain posture while pushing the bar directly overhead.

As with the bench press there are many critics of the overhead press because of shoulder injuries; however, this is due to poor form and a lack of balance in training. Chances are if your joints are giving you pain on an exercise it’s because your form is incorrect or you have muscle imbalances, get those fixed before throwing an exercise in the trash. The overhead press is a safer upper body press than the bench press because it forces the back muscles, core muscles (abs, obliques, glutes, errectors, serratus anterior and everything in-between) and shoulder muscles to stabilize a load overhead while allowing the scapula to actively move through a full range of motion. The overhead press will build stronger, healthier shoulders while also providing much-needed stability for the shoulder joint due to the synergy required among the bodies muscles to properly perform the exercise.

Here is how to perform overhead press:

Set Up

  • Either power clean the weight into position or un-rack the weight from a squat rack set at sternum level.
  • Grip the Bar with a slightly wider than shoulder width grip and squeeze until your knuckles are white.

-Play with using a false grip (thumbs not wrapped around the bar), it works better for some people, but is not as safe.

  • Breath in the air you can to stabilize your torso and squat the bar out of the rack, keeping your lats and upper back tight.
  • Keep the bar and chest high, this will create a larger base from which to push from as the bar sits higher on the anterior deltoids.
  • Find a fixed object and stare at it, no need to look up or down, tuck your chin and pack your neck.


  • Squeeze those cheeks! Squeezing your glutes will help to stabilize your torso. This will prevent you from excessively arching your lower back.
  • Push the bar overhead without extending the knees, this is not a push press.
  • When the bar clears you head, shift your head and body underneath the bar.
  • Squeeze your shoulders down and together, as if you were putting them into your back pocket.
  • Fully lockout the elbows and stabilize the weight overhead on each rep, this builds a powerful lockout and will make for a healthier, stronger shoulder.


  • Lower the weight back to collarbone level if possible, otherwise as low as your chin will suffice.
  • Keep the bar racked high on your chest as your start each rep.

Miscellaneous Tips

  • Consider investing in a pair of wraps, I use these Wrist Wraps and they work just fine.
  • Push the bar overhead not out in front of the body. If you push out in front you will lose upper back tightness and total body stability.
  • Learn to bail on the lift correctly or perform the presses in a power rack with supports underneath you. Don’t crush your noggin’ junior!

The Overhead press is a great lift that hopefully will gain popularity and yet again become a mainstay in fitness programming. It not only builds strength, but stability and power in the upper body. Press on!

Please leave your comments below,

Eric Bach, CSCS

Copyright 2012 by Eric R Bach.  All rights reserved.  This material may not be duplicated or distributed without written consent from the author.

photo credit: <a href=”http://www.flickr.com/photos/elcamino73/7223394614/”>elcamino73</a> via <a href=”http://photopin.com”>photopin</a> <a href=”http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/”>cc</a>

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